Curiosity Killed the Cat, but it Can Catapult Your Career

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Think about this: some of the most exciting and innovative ideas have sparked from curiosity. So, why not be more curious at work? Why not ask more questions and dig deeper? The impulse to learn more and explore new possibilities can catapult your career into a higher level.

Curiosity allows leaders to gain more respect from their team and inspires team members to develop more trusting and collaborative relationships with their coworkers. Here are a few benefits being curious could have on your career.

#1. More Positive Changes

In both creative and non-creative careers, encouraging teammates to be curious generates improvements in the workplace. Why is this? Simply because when we are faced with tough situations we often have to be more creative in implementing solutions. The answer isn’t so black and white, so we tap into our curiosity to see what other types of solutions will work. This results in positive changes in the workplace.

#2. Reduces Conflict Amongst Teams

Research from the Harvard Business Review found that curiosity encourages members of a team to put themselves in each other’s shoes and take an interest in each other’s ideas rather than only look at things through their perspective. This helps teams work together more smoothly and effectively. Conflicts are handled with less confrontation and more logic, helping teams achieve better overall results and reaching better solutions.

#3. Better Communication

When you are willing to put yourself out there and offer ideas that have stemmed from your curiosity, you communicate better because you are being transparent. By being more open and less fearful of sharing your thoughts, you can grow. Think of how many ideas may not have come to fruition if the person had been too afraid to tell others what ideas they had? You don’t need to have a million-dollar idea every time, but you do need to let your curiosity propel you to share your thoughts with your team at work.

#4. Fewer Errors Regarding Decision-Making

According to research by the Harvard Business Review, when curiosity is triggered, we are less likely to fall victim to confirmation bias, which is essentially looking for data and information that backs up our beliefs rather than looking at the whole picture which includes evidence that we are wrong. Curiosity leads to alternative answers that may not be immediately available. If you look at all aspects of a situation and explore other options, you are likely to make fewer errors when making important decisions.

Your career will never grow if you continue to do what you are told and never ask questions. A company is only as good as it is challenged. Be curious, ask questions, challenge solutions. You never know what kinds of things you could accomplish just by testing the boundaries. Leaders never became leaders by staying in their comfort zones. If you continue to do the same thing, you will receive the same results. Step outside of the box and let your curiosity take over sometimes. Curiosity may have killed the cat, but it will give your career new life if you let it.